Showing: 1 - 2 of 2 Results
Shakespeare's Career

All About Shakespeare’s Career

Regarded as the England’s national poet and greatest playwright who ever lived, William Shakespeare had more theatrical acts played than any other dramatists in history. Even now, numerous theater festivals all over the world glorify his works, and even students familiarize his articulate poems and reenact his heartwarming plays. In this article, you will learn Shakespeare’s incredible career. You can still find his work on Craigslist Personals Replacement or on craigslist.

Early Years

Nobody knows how Shakespeare first began his career in the theater. Between 1585 and 1592, however, a number of London troupes would tour in Stratford frequently, so it is possible that young Shakespeare could have been hired by the Queen’s or Leicester’s men. Nevertheless, regardless of how he got into his acting career, he was an accomplished actor in London at the end of 1592.

The Turning Point

The pivotal moment in Shakespeare’s career occurred in 1593. All the theaters had been shut down since 1592 because of a plague outbreak. Due to this, there’s a possibility that Shakespeare went on a tour to the remote areas of London with some performing companies such as the Lord Strange’s Men or Pembroke’s Men. During these times, it appears more likely that he quit his theater career completely and concentrates on his non-dramatic poetry. By the end of 1593, Shakespeare’s hard work gained him peer recognition as Earl of Southampton noticed his works. Eventually, Earl became his patron and on April 18, 1593, “Venus and Adonis” was published. This is his official debut as a lyricist.

The Theater Comeback

In 1594, he returned to acting and making script for a group called the Lord Chamberlain’s Men where he eventually became the resident dramatist. This showed that Shakespeare had acted already with the Chamberlain’s Men even before Elizabeth I on numerous events. As a reward for their performance, all the actors were given 10 pounds each. In this period, Shakespeare was able to write many plays such as the “Richard II,” “Romeo and Juliet,” “Love’s Labour’s Lost” and “King John”. According to G.E. Bentley in “Shakespeare and the Theatre”, William Shakespeare became engrossed in his roles as writer and an actor by this time. He was constantly and totally involved in acting companies and theaters than any other playwright. Shakespeare is the one and only artist who not only wrote and acted plays for his company and shared the earnings but also served as a caretaker of his own building. For seventeen years, he was one of the landlords of the Globe theater and was also one of the housekeepers of the company’s second theater called the Blackfriars for eight years. Shakespeare and the Chamberlain’s Men also performed in well-established theaters like the Theater, Curtain and Swan, even before their acquisition of the Globe in 1599. Their group also performed regular shows for Elizabeth I and her court.

Even though William Shakespeare died a long time ago, his plays and poems are still relevant in today’s new generation. In fact, First Folio was sold in 2006 for 4.6 million. It is an original compilation of the 36 plays in Mr. William Shakespeare’s Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies. It is believed that there are still 228 copies existed to this date. If you’re an avid fan of William Shakespeare and is trying to acquire rare collectible items, try to find it online or on Craigslist.

Shakespeare Take Inspiration from Cannabis

Did Shakespeare Take Inspiration from Cannabis?

Following the recent legalization by state law of cannabis and cannabis-related products, the interest in the plant and the usage of its components for varying reasons has grown exponentially. More and more people are finding themselves drawn to using cannabis and cannabis-related products such as CBD oil and edible as they are now widely known to be a healthy alternative to conventional medicines.

Along with this curiosity about what cannabis can do, the interest in its history has also grown. Where did it come from? How long has it been in existence and in use? What influence has it had on history and historical figures, and if so, how much?

Shakespeare and Cannabis

Recently, scientists from South Africa who were studying tobacco pipes that were recovered from Shakespeare’s home spoke of the traces of cannabis that were discovered in the pipes. This finding has sparked a discussion over whether or not Shakespeare and his iconic works were indeed influenced by cannabis. Was the famous playwright and his works inspired by the drug?

While investigating William Shakespeare’s home in Stratford-upon-Avon, England, scientists discovered tobacco pipes originating in the 17th century. Upon the examination of the pipes through advanced scientific means (a chemical test by the name of Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry or GCMS), scientists and botanists alike were able to identify the presence of cannabis on the fragments of the pipes.

The chemical test used was able to determine the presence of various drugs on pipe bowls found at the home of the playwright. The drug contents found include cocaine, various hallucinogens, and compounds that come from burned cannabis.

Upon closer examination by anthropologists, it has been suggested that Shakespeare has indeed referenced the usage of drugs in his works, such as in the case of Shakespeare’s Sonnet 76: “Why with the time do I not glance aside / To new-found methods, and to compounds strange? / Why write I still all one, ever the same, / And keep invention in a noted weed…” It has been implied by experts and academicians that the ‘noted weed’ Shakespeare was referring to might be an allusion to the usage of cannabis as tobacco.

Though Shakespeare’s remains cannot be exhumed and examined for evidence of drug usage, forensics and historians claim that the revelation that William Shakespeare used drugs and was inspired by it is not at all shocking as he lived in a time where the smoking of diverse plants was not particularly taboo. The 17th century Elizabethan England was a hotbed for drug usage, and experts say that it is not impossible for Shakespeare to have been exposed to them.

Whether or not Shakespeare used cannabis or was inspired by it, this discovery and the presence of this discussion carries significant implications in the argument against the infamy and harmfulness of cannabis. If a playwright as successful as Shakespeare was indeed a user of this drug and was able to flourish as much as he did during his time, then who can say that the usage of cannabis and related products, especially for medicinal purposes, is criminal and harmful?